Copyright

New Copyright Court

New Copyright Court Last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee approved the Senate version of the Copyright Small Claims Bill.  That bill, known as the Copyright Alternative in Small-Claims Enforcement Act of 2019 now moves out of committee and will go the floor to be voted on by the full Senate.  An identical companion bill, H.R. Read more about New Copyright Court[…]

Acknowledging Use

Acknowledging Use of a Photograph Many people believe they can use someone else’s work as long at they acknowledge that the work belongs to someone else.  However, using someone else’s photo is not permissible just because they provide credit to the photographer.  If someone has permission to use a photo, then they have permission.  If Read more about Acknowledging Use[…]

Intellectual Property Law Updates

Intellectual Property Updates

Intellectual Property Law Update Patent Congress released a draft of proposed patent legislation to address the ongoing problem with Subject Matter Rejections, namely, 101 Rejections.  The proposed new patent law proposes that patents should be awarded to: Whoever invents or discovers any useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any useful improvement thereof, may Read more about Intellectual Property Updates[…]

Intellectual Property Law Update

In today’s intellectual property law update, the USPTO (United States Patent and Trademark Office) announced that their electronic system will again be down for maintenance for the entire weekend. Strike 3 Holdings, a prolific adult movie producer, who filed almost 2,000 copyright infringement lawsuits last year, has seen more of its copyright lawsuits dismissed for Read more about Intellectual Property Law Update[…]

Who wins, Batman or Copyright?

One of my favorite quotes goes something like this, “always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then be Batman.” Well, when it comes to copyrighting weeds, I would rather be Batman. Copyright Lawsuit In a recent Copyright Case, an artist sued the Batman actor, Val Kilmer, for stealing his golden weeds. Specifically, tumbleweeds. The Read more about Who wins, Batman or Copyright?[…]

101 Series – How to Prepare a Copyright Application

Copyright Registration Since 1978, registering a work of art for copyright protection is no longer required.  While a registration is not required, a copyright registration does provide enhanced rights, including the right to collect monetary damages.  Under federal law, a timely registered copyright allows the author of the work to collect damages which are provided Read more about 101 Series – How to Prepare a Copyright Application[…]

Copyright Registration Required

U.S. Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States ruled that Copyright Registrations are required prior to filing a Copyright Infringement lawsuit in Fourth Estate Public Benefit Corp. v. Wall-street.com, LLC, No. 17-571, 586 U.S. ___ (March 4, 2019). This settles the division between the circuits in which some courts allowed an infringement action Read more about Copyright Registration Required[…]

Copyright Application vs. Copyright Registration

Today, the U.S. Supreme Court announced that it will take on the issue of whether a copyright registration or a copyright application is required before bringing a copyright infringement suit. Currently, depending on the location of your copyright lawsuit, some courts require a copyright registration.  Other Courts simply require that you have filed a copyright application Read more about Copyright Application vs. Copyright Registration[…]

Pay BEFORE You Play: Why Music Licensing Matters

Does your business need a license to play music? Do you really need a music license just to play cover songs? Music licensing is not something to gamble with. Spotify recently settled a class action lawsuit for more than $43 million after failing to pay publishers and songwriters when they streamed their music. While Spotify’s Read more about Pay BEFORE You Play: Why Music Licensing Matters[…]

Music Copyright Law: “Musical Works” and Sound Recordings

Copyright Law: Distinguishing Between Musical Works and Sound Recordings In general terms, copyright protection extends to “original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression.” Pursuant to Section 102 of the federal Copyright Act (“the Act”), works of authorship include, among other categories: Musical works, including any accompanying words; and Sound recordings. As Read more about Music Copyright Law: “Musical Works” and Sound Recordings[…]